Arlington Sculpture Garden

Meadowbrook Park, located east of downtown, is the oldest park in Arlington. It opened in 1924. Not only was it the first park in Arlington, but it was also the first to have a golf course and indoor recreation center. Amenities today also include a playground, basketball court, walking trails, horseshoe pits, pavilion, and public art.

Arlington Sculpture Garden

Speaking of public art, located in Meadowbrook Park is the Arlington Sculpture Garden. The garden is near the corner of Abram Street and Willis Avenue and features seven works of art. The artwork is lit at night, which allows an entirely different viewing experience from the daytime. While driving down Abram Street, they definitely stand out from the trees when they’re lit. Although not my first time here, it was my first time to see the sculptures at night.

All of these artists are immensely talented. Most are local or have ties to the North Texas area. Their works can be found in public art, private collections, and exhibits. Check out their websites for more info!


“The Sea” by Otello Guarducci

These abstract steel structures, created in 1980, resemble ocean waves — both in their movement and color. The piece used to be in Ditto Golf Course but has found a new home in the Arlington Sculpture Garden.

Mr. Guarducci (1922-2012) was born in Italy but moved to the U.S. in 1948. His sculptures can be found in public art and private collections.

“The Sea” by Otello Guarducci

“Leave Your Mark” by Janna Tidwell

jannatidwellstudio.com
This 8’ by 8’ steel sculpture of a white rose has fingerprint-like cutouts in the rose petals. Her work often includes steel, bold patterns, and geometry. She is a sculptor and landscape architect. Ms. Tidwell lives and works in North Texas, but her New Mexico heritage shines through her work.

“Leave Your Mark” by Janna Tidwell

“TexScape” by Rock Romano

Mr. Romano is based out of Houston, Texas, and owns the Red Shack Recording Studio. He’s a painter, musician, audio engineer, and record producer.

“TexScape” is part of “The Star of Texas” project. There are more than twenty of these stars scattered throughout Arlington. Each star is six feet tall, fiberglass, and painted in a different theme and personality.

“TexScape” by Rock Romano

“Brighten My Day” by Eddie and Mary Phillips

An interactive piece, viewers can turn the wheels of this enormous kaleidoscope. It’s the largest piece they have built, and Mary made the glass wheels in their studio. Artist Eddie Phillips calls it “nostalgic” because “everybody has a memory of [looking through] a kaleidoscope at some point in their life.”

Eddie and Mary are a husband and wife team out of Mansfield, Texas. They work out of their “Blue Goat Garden and Glass Studio.” The team painted many of the murals in Historic Downtown Mansfield. Their work is a mixture of science, nature, and art.

“Brighten My Day” by Eddie and Mary Phillips

“Blue Sky Dream” by Seth Vandable

vandablesculpture.com
One of the more prominent pieces in the garden is a 10-foot tall bronze sculpture. It’s a magnificent piece that depicts a woman on one side and a man on the other — both admiring a newborn baby in their outstretched arms.

The monument is by local sculptor Seth Vandable, who is based in the Dallas area. He also created the “K9 Memorial” and “The Gift” — two other sculptures in Arlington. Mr. Vandable’s work includes public art, sculptures, memorials, and even superhero statues. 

“Blue Sky Dream” by Seth Vandable

“Fern Fronds” by Pascale Pryor

pascalesculptures.com
These metallic structures are inspired by nature and musical notes. Ms. Pryor is based in Dallas, Texas. Her primary focus is sculpting, but her work also includes welding, ceramics, stained glass, and painting.

“Fern Fronds” by Pascale Pryor

“Dragonflies” by David Hickman

davidbhickman.com
“Dragonflies” is one of Mr. Hickman’s wind-activated, kinetic pieces. When the wind picks up, this piece will move with the wind.

Mr. Hickman is primarily a sculptor and also works with metal, stone, and glass. From Gainesville, Texas, he later relocated to Dallas. His work can be found in public art, private collections, and exhibits.

“Dragonflies” by David Hickman

Sources

Meadowbrook Sculpture Garden Board, “Meadowbrook Sculpture Garden.” Accessed January 31, 2021. https://www.meadowbrookartinpark.com/

City of Arlington, Texas, “Public Art,” City of Arlington, Texas official website. Accessed January 31, 2021.
https://www.arlingtontx.gov/residents/about_arlington/public_art

City of Arlington, Texas, “Meadowbrook Park,” City of Arlington, Texas official website. Accessed January 31, 2021.
https://www.arlingtontx.gov/residents/about_arlington/history_of_arlington/what_s_in_the_name_/meadowbrook_park


Post and photos by Jason S. Sullivan, 01-31-21

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